Staff

Tides of Change Wellness Collaborative is a family owned and operated practice. Dr. Davis and Dr. Wells met during medical school, and spent many years side-by-side learning and teaching. They are both passionate about health and wellness and use their osteopathic training as an underlying approach to care. Osteopathic medicine is based on the premise that the primary role of the physician is to facilitate the body’s inherent ability to heal itself. We believe that the body is a triune - an integrated unit of mind, body and spirit and that each individual possesses self regulatory mechanisms that have the capacity to defend, repair and remodel itself. We believe that the structure of the body is integral to its function and incorporate a functional screening of the range of motion and restrictions within the musculoskeletal system into our patient care model. Though much of our training was the same, we each bring our unique perspective to each consultation. 

  • Lauren Davis
    DO
    Lead Physician

    Dr. Davis attended Ursinus College in Pennsylvania where she led the Ursinus College softball team to three Centennial Conference Championships. She holds a degree in Biology and graduated as a member of the Tri-Beta Honors Fraternity. 

    She attended Lincoln Memorial University’s DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine where she was selected as one of four people from her graduating class as an Anatomy and Osteopathic Manipulation Undergraduate Fellow. She gave numerous lectures in both subjects, including a sports medicine lecture series. 

    Her residency training was completed at Stony Brook University’s Southampton Campus in their Residency in Social Medicine. She served as chief resident in her final year of a combined Family Medicine and Osteopathic Neuromuscular Medicine Residency. She also completed the residency training program from the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine through the University of Arizona. 

    She is board certified in Family Medicine/OMT and Osteopathic Neuromuscular Medicine and a member of the Institute for Functional Medicine. 

    What makes you different from other doctors in your practice?

    In my spare time, I serve as serve as a moderator for the organization, Dr. MILK (Physician Mother’s interested in Lactation Knowledge). It is a group of 25K+ female physicians who have come together to better understand lactation physiology and best breastfeeding practices in the United States and how to help all women reach their lactating goals. 

    I am a passionate advocate for Women’s Health, and understanding how women’s sexual, reproductive and physiologic needs. This started for me in college with differentiating the needs for female athletes for top performance, and expanded to include performance nutrition, including nutritional requirements during lactation.  

    What do you want people to understand about the way you practice medicine?

    Optimal health and wellness start with our everyday choices. Our bodies are finely tuned machines that need the correct nutrients to function optimally. Based on our genetics, we each have individual needs to perform at our peak level. 

    Health is unencumbered motion. Modern diseases are what I would consider dysregulation of the biochemical pathways in our bodies and a stasis of motion. Restoration of this motion and movement, from basic cellular components to gross anatomical motion, will change your health outcomes. This is my overall, long term goal for every patient. 

    What do you wish every one of your patients would do and why?

    Don’t be afraid to get to know yourself! Whether we realize it or not, many of our external actions come from our internal beliefs. One of the most important aspects of having a deep and satisfying life is having a kind and compassionate relationship with oneself. 

  • Craig Wells
    DO
    Lead Physician

    Dr. Wells attended Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio and practiced various martial arts and earned Bachelor's Degree in Biology with a minor in psychology. 

    He attended Lincoln Memorial University’s DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine where he was selected as one of four people from the graduating class as an Anatomy and Osteopathic Manipulation Undergraduate Fellow. He was part of the Wilderness Medicine Club and taught a course on Osteopathic Principles and Manipulations to the Physician’s Assistant Program. 

    His residency was completed at Stony Brook University’s Southampton Campus in their Residency in Social Medicine. He served as the Academic Chief Resident and planned weekly lectures on Osteopathic Manipulation for fellow residents and medical students. He also completed the residency training program from the Andrew Weil Center for Integrative Medicine through the University of Arizona. 

    He is board certified in Family Medicine/OMT and Osteopathic Neuromuscular Medicine and a member of the Institute for Functional Medicine. 

    What makes you different from other doctors in your practice?

    Growing up, I studied many different forms of martial arts. Integral in most martial practices is a knowledge of the human body and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) concepts. For me, this started passion for studying and reconciling many of the martial teachings with our western medical system. I incorporate many eastern philosophies and diagnostics into my patient encounters to optimize my recommended interventions for each and every one of my patients. 

    What do you want people to understand about the way you practice medicine?

    Medicine, to me, should focus on optimizing overall health and wellness that includes: biological, physical, psychological, social and emotional wellbeing. As we are one being, these can not be addressed individually, but only within the spectrum of self. Attaining health starts off as a journey but for all, this journey culminates with consideration of the relationship with yourself. I see myself a guide to this journey and will ask many introspective questions throughout our time together. 

    What do you wish every one of your patients would do and why?

    I want for every person to do three things: 1. Eat the rainbow. Getting phytonutrients and sustaining energy from our food is key to life. The more color we eat as close to harvest as possible is the foundation of health. 2. Find movement that makes you happy. We were designed to move. Do it, every day. 3. Sleep like a baby. We restore our minds and bodies with sleep. It is vital to our health. When you’re tired, rest and restore.